Who might you meet?

The CAMHS team is made up of a variety of professionals called a multi-disciplinary team; this allows us to meet your individual needs. The exact mix of the teams varies across locations.

Choose your location or team below. If you do not know your location or team, select Don't Know.

West Team

A Receptionist will say hello when you arrive, let your worker know you are here and make sure your contact details and appointments are up to date. They may also ask you to fill out forms or provide some feedback.

A psychologist is interested in the scientific study of how people think, feel and behave. They use this knowledge to help people make sense of things and work on making changes to improve their quality of life. Psychologists use a range of evidence-based treatments to do this work. Most of these treatments involve some talking therapy although more creative approaches to therapy are also used as required. It all depends on your individual need and what works for you. Psychologists are also trained to use specialist tools to assess and understand difficulties; these tools are used in combination with the information you and your family provide to form an understanding of what might be going on and to plan with you the most effective treatment.

CAMHS Nurses are trained to understand all mental health difficulties and will have a variety of therapy and other skills to help you in the most useful way. Our CAMHS nurses do NOT wear a uniform but do have lots of experience working with young people who need their help. Some of the nurses are non-medical prescribers and will discuss medication with you.

Not all personal issues are easy to talk or think about. Art Therapists can help make this easier or possible by providing a choice of art materials to use alongside or instead of talking. They won't expect you to be good at art, just willing to try. An art therapist will have a background in using art but also a full training as an art therapist.

Child Psychotherapists will try to understand what is troubling you, and help you put your thoughts and feelings into words. Making sense of difficulties alongside another person can make things easier to manage. We use drawing/painting, toys or talking, depending on how you feel most comfortable communicating. There's no pressure to talk about difficult things directly. First of all, you will be given a series of appointments to see if this way of working will be helpful. We might also want to see you alongside your family, too, and sometimes we might want to see your parents on their own.

Occupational Therapists are interested in activities you do and helping you to do the things you want or need to do in life. You may not be able to do some of these things due to your emotional health. We may focus more on the practical ways of helping you to achieve your goals – for example, you may feel unable to go out and meet your friends due to how you feel. Your OT will work with you to help you achieve this by breaking it down into manageable steps.

Family therapy can help children and young people, struggling with mental health issues, by looking at relationships within their families, so that they improve the understanding of each other and therefore better support each other. It helps family members to talk about and express difficult thoughts and feelings in a safe way, hear each other's views and experiences, appreciate each other's needs, build on strengths and work on positive changes in relationships and life.

Child & Adolescent Psychiatrists are medical doctors who specialise in the assessment and treatment of mental health, emotional and behavioural problems in children and young people. They work as part of the CAMHS team (which consists of nurses, psychologists, different types of therapists) and the team decides who is the best person to help a young person referred to the service with their particular problem.

Youth workers are able to use a variety of skills to help young people within the service, like having a chat over coffee to playing a game of pool. They can adapt their techniques and style of working around whatever young person prefers and needs.

Primary Mental health Workers (PMHWs) are usually based in the community near to where young people live, and they offer what is called an early intervention and prevention service to children, young people and their families, to promote emotional health and well-being. They help children and young people to deal with their emotional or behavioural difficulties before they get too complicated and well established. Sometimes PMHWs work on a 1-1 basis with the young person, sometimes they work with the parents or carers, or sometimes a bit of both. It all depends on what suits the young person, what the young person wants and what is the best way of addressing their issues.

The role of a PMHW also includes training and advising teachers and other professionals to increase their awareness and understanding of the emotional health issues that affect young people. This helps them to be able to identify those issues and to know what they can do to help. This means that the teacher or other professional (e.g. school nurse or family support worker) may be able to help the young person without having to make a referral into CAMHS.

CAMHS Social Workers are different from other social workers in that they are based and work in CAMHS, as part of the multi-disciplinary Team.. They will have a variety of training, skills and experience in supporting children, young people and families to keep them safe, healthy and happy. CAMHS social workers also support and give advice to other workers in the CAMHS team and other services, as well as having important therapy skills too!

Lichfield Team

A Receptionist will say hello when you arrive, let your worker know you are here and make sure your contact details and appointments are up to date. They may also ask you to fill out forms or provide some feedback.

A psychologist is interested in the scientific study of how people think, feel and behave. They use this knowledge to help people make sense of things and work on making changes to improve their quality of life. Psychologists use a range of evidence-based treatments to do this work. Most of these treatments involve some talking therapy although more creative approaches to therapy are also used as required. It all depends on your individual need and what works for you. Psychologists are also trained to use specialist tools to assess and understand difficulties; these tools are used in combination with the information you and your family provide to form an understanding of what might be going on and to plan with you the most effective treatment.

CAMHS Nurses are trained to understand all mental health difficulties and will have a variety of therapy and other skills to help you in the most useful way. Our CAMHS nurses do NOT wear a uniform but do have lots of experience working with young people who need their help. Some of the nurses are non-medical prescribers and will discuss medication with you.

Not all personal issues are easy to talk or think about. Art Therapists can help make this easier or possible by providing a choice of art materials to use alongside or instead of talking. They won't expect you to be good at art, just willing to try. An art therapist will have a background in using art but also a full training as an art therapist.

Child Psychotherapists will try to understand what is troubling you, and help you put your thoughts and feelings into words. Making sense of difficulties alongside another person can make things easier to manage. We use drawing/painting, toys or talking, depending on how you feel most comfortable communicating. There's no pressure to talk about difficult things directly. First of all, you will be given a series of appointments to see if this way of working will be helpful. We might also want to see you alongside your family, too, and sometimes we might want to see your parents on their own.

Occupational Therapists are interested in activities you do and helping you to do the things you want or need to do in life. You may not be able to do some of these things due to your emotional health. We may focus more on the practical ways of helping you to achieve your goals – for example, you may feel unable to go out and meet your friends due to how you feel. Your OT will work with you to help you achieve this by breaking it down into manageable steps.

Family therapy can help children and young people, struggling with mental health issues, by looking at relationships within their families, so that they improve the understanding of each other and therefore better support each other. It helps family members to talk about and express difficult thoughts and feelings in a safe way, hear each other's views and experiences, appreciate each other's needs, build on strengths and work on positive changes in relationships and life.

Child & Adolescent Psychiatrists are medical doctors who specialise in the assessment and treatment of mental health, emotional and behavioural problems in children and young people. They work as part of the CAMHS team (which consists of nurses, psychologists, different types of therapists) and the team decides who is the best person to help a young person referred to the service with their particular problem.

Youth workers are able to use a variety of skills to help young people within the service, like having a chat over coffee to playing a game of pool. They can adapt their techniques and style of working around whatever young person prefers and needs.

Primary Mental health Workers (PMHWs) are usually based in the community near to where young people live, and they offer what is called an early intervention and prevention service to children, young people and their families, to promote emotional health and well-being. They help children and young people to deal with their emotional or behavioural difficulties before they get too complicated and well established. Sometimes PMHWs work on a 1-1 basis with the young person, sometimes they work with the parents or carers, or sometimes a bit of both. It all depends on what suits the young person, what the young person wants and what is the best way of addressing their issues.

The role of a PMHW also includes training and advising teachers and other professionals to increase their awareness and understanding of the emotional health issues that affect young people. This helps them to be able to identify those issues and to know what they can do to help. This means that the teacher or other professional (e.g. school nurse or family support worker) may be able to help the young person without having to make a referral into CAMHS.

CAMHS Social Workers are different from other social workers in that they are based and work in CAMHS, as part of the multi-disciplinary Team.. They will have a variety of training, skills and experience in supporting children, young people and families to keep them safe, healthy and happy. CAMHS social workers also support and give advice to other workers in the CAMHS team and other services, as well as having important therapy skills too!

Tamworth Team

A Receptionist will say hello when you arrive, let your worker know you are here and make sure your contact details and appointments are up to date. They may also ask you to fill out forms or provide some feedback.

A psychologist is interested in the scientific study of how people think, feel and behave. They use this knowledge to help people make sense of things and work on making changes to improve their quality of life. Psychologists use a range of evidence-based treatments to do this work. Most of these treatments involve some talking therapy although more creative approaches to therapy are also used as required. It all depends on your individual need and what works for you. Psychologists are also trained to use specialist tools to assess and understand difficulties; these tools are used in combination with the information you and your family provide to form an understanding of what might be going on and to plan with you the most effective treatment.

CAMHS Nurses are trained to understand all mental health difficulties and will have a variety of therapy and other skills to help you in the most useful way. Our CAMHS nurses do NOT wear a uniform but do have lots of experience working with young people who need their help. Some of the nurses are non-medical prescribers and will discuss medication with you.

Not all personal issues are easy to talk or think about. Art Therapists can help make this easier or possible by providing a choice of art materials to use alongside or instead of talking. They won't expect you to be good at art, just willing to try. An art therapist will have a background in using art but also a full training as an art therapist.

Child Psychotherapists will try to understand what is troubling you, and help you put your thoughts and feelings into words. Making sense of difficulties alongside another person can make things easier to manage. We use drawing/painting, toys or talking, depending on how you feel most comfortable communicating. There's no pressure to talk about difficult things directly. First of all, you will be given a series of appointments to see if this way of working will be helpful. We might also want to see you alongside your family, too, and sometimes we might want to see your parents on their own.

Occupational Therapists are interested in activities you do and helping you to do the things you want or need to do in life. You may not be able to do some of these things due to your emotional health. We may focus more on the practical ways of helping you to achieve your goals – for example, you may feel unable to go out and meet your friends due to how you feel. Your OT will work with you to help you achieve this by breaking it down into manageable steps.

Family therapy can help children and young people, struggling with mental health issues, by looking at relationships within their families, so that they improve the understanding of each other and therefore better support each other. It helps family members to talk about and express difficult thoughts and feelings in a safe way, hear each other's views and experiences, appreciate each other's needs, build on strengths and work on positive changes in relationships and life.

Child & Adolescent Psychiatrists are medical doctors who specialise in the assessment and treatment of mental health, emotional and behavioural problems in children and young people. They work as part of the CAMHS team (which consists of nurses, psychologists, different types of therapists) and the team decides who is the best person to help a young person referred to the service with their particular problem.

Youth workers are able to use a variety of skills to help young people within the service, like having a chat over coffee to playing a game of pool. They can adapt their techniques and style of working around whatever young person prefers and needs.

Primary Mental health Workers (PMHWs) are usually based in the community near to where young people live, and they offer what is called an early intervention and prevention service to children, young people and their families, to promote emotional health and well-being. They help children and young people to deal with their emotional or behavioural difficulties before they get too complicated and well established. Sometimes PMHWs work on a 1-1 basis with the young person, sometimes they work with the parents or carers, or sometimes a bit of both. It all depends on what suits the young person, what the young person wants and what is the best way of addressing their issues.

The role of a PMHW also includes training and advising teachers and other professionals to increase their awareness and understanding of the emotional health issues that affect young people. This helps them to be able to identify those issues and to know what they can do to help. This means that the teacher or other professional (e.g. school nurse or family support worker) may be able to help the young person without having to make a referral into CAMHS.

CAMHS Social Workers are different from other social workers in that they are based and work in CAMHS, as part of the multi-disciplinary Team.. They will have a variety of training, skills and experience in supporting children, young people and families to keep them safe, healthy and happy. CAMHS social workers also support and give advice to other workers in the CAMHS team and other services, as well as having important therapy skills too!

Burton Team

A Receptionist will say hello when you arrive, let your worker know you are here and make sure your contact details and appointments are up to date. They may also ask you to fill out forms or provide some feedback.

A psychologist is interested in the scientific study of how people think, feel and behave. They use this knowledge to help people make sense of things and work on making changes to improve their quality of life. Psychologists use a range of evidence-based treatments to do this work. Most of these treatments involve some talking therapy although more creative approaches to therapy are also used as required. It all depends on your individual need and what works for you. Psychologists are also trained to use specialist tools to assess and understand difficulties; these tools are used in combination with the information you and your family provide to form an understanding of what might be going on and to plan with you the most effective treatment.

CAMHS Nurses are trained to understand all mental health difficulties and will have a variety of therapy and other skills to help you in the most useful way. Our CAMHS nurses do NOT wear a uniform but do have lots of experience working with young people who need their help. Some of the nurses are non-medical prescribers and will discuss medication with you.

Not all personal issues are easy to talk or think about. Art Therapists can help make this easier or possible by providing a choice of art materials to use alongside or instead of talking. They won't expect you to be good at art, just willing to try. An art therapist will have a background in using art but also a full training as an art therapist.

Child Psychotherapists will try to understand what is troubling you, and help you put your thoughts and feelings into words. Making sense of difficulties alongside another person can make things easier to manage. We use drawing/painting, toys or talking, depending on how you feel most comfortable communicating. There's no pressure to talk about difficult things directly. First of all, you will be given a series of appointments to see if this way of working will be helpful. We might also want to see you alongside your family, too, and sometimes we might want to see your parents on their own.

Occupational Therapists are interested in activities you do and helping you to do the things you want or need to do in life. You may not be able to do some of these things due to your emotional health. We may focus more on the practical ways of helping you to achieve your goals – for example, you may feel unable to go out and meet your friends due to how you feel. Your OT will work with you to help you achieve this by breaking it down into manageable steps.

Family therapy can help children and young people, struggling with mental health issues, by looking at relationships within their families, so that they improve the understanding of each other and therefore better support each other. It helps family members to talk about and express difficult thoughts and feelings in a safe way, hear each other's views and experiences, appreciate each other's needs, build on strengths and work on positive changes in relationships and life.

Child & Adolescent Psychiatrists are medical doctors who specialise in the assessment and treatment of mental health, emotional and behavioural problems in children and young people. They work as part of the CAMHS team (which consists of nurses, psychologists, different types of therapists) and the team decides who is the best person to help a young person referred to the service with their particular problem.

Youth workers are able to use a variety of skills to help young people within the service, like having a chat over coffee to playing a game of pool. They can adapt their techniques and style of working around whatever young person prefers and needs.

Primary Mental health Workers (PMHWs) are usually based in the community near to where young people live, and they offer what is called an early intervention and prevention service to children, young people and their families, to promote emotional health and well-being. They help children and young people to deal with their emotional or behavioural difficulties before they get too complicated and well established. Sometimes PMHWs work on a 1-1 basis with the young person, sometimes they work with the parents or carers, or sometimes a bit of both. It all depends on what suits the young person, what the young person wants and what is the best way of addressing their issues.

The role of a PMHW also includes training and advising teachers and other professionals to increase their awareness and understanding of the emotional health issues that affect young people. This helps them to be able to identify those issues and to know what they can do to help. This means that the teacher or other professional (e.g. school nurse or family support worker) may be able to help the young person without having to make a referral into CAMHS.

CAMHS Social Workers are different from other social workers in that they are based and work in CAMHS, as part of the multi-disciplinary Team.. They will have a variety of training, skills and experience in supporting children, young people and families to keep them safe, healthy and happy. CAMHS social workers also support and give advice to other workers in the CAMHS team and other services, as well as having important therapy skills too!

IOT

What does the Intensive Outreach Team do?

"We offer home based interventions to young people and their families in the right place at the right time"

For a very small number of young people intensive assessment and treatment packages are needed. That is where we come in: the Intensive Outreach Team’s main aim is to prevent hospital admission. We work with young people and their families alongside CAMHS which means your allocated CAMHS worker will still see you regularly and remain involved in your care. If you do need to go into hospital we will offer you intensive support to facilitate a quick and smooth discharge back to your home.

We aim to reduce crisis situations and support risk management.

We can offer a number of visits per week depending on your need.

We offer a flexible approach and can work with young people at home, at school or somewhere in the community where you feel comfortable.

We can work alongside schools or colleges to make sure you have the right kind of support for your educational needs. This may include supporting you in meetings with teachers, ensuring school or college understand how your current situation may affect your education and advising them on how to best support your needs and help you maintain your education.

We will provide you with a named worker who will be the person you meet on a regular basis, this person will be the team member we feel has the right skills to best support you. However, as we have a team approach to your care you will be introduced to other members of the team who may also offer you some support.

We can offer support to you for up to 12 weeks. This will be regularly reviewed with you, the Intensive Outreach Team, your family and your CAMHS worker.

Who can refer you?

Your CAMHS team can refer you to us if they feel you need some additional support at home or in hospital.

Meeting another CAMHS worker

We realise that opening up to a new person can be quite a scary thought. You might not want to tell your Intensive Outreach worker what you are thinking or how you are feeling because you think it sounds silly, or you are worried how other people will think about you because of it.

Everyone at the Intensive Outreach Team has lots of experience working with children and young people, and there isn’t much that can shock us!

It is important to be open and honest, because this makes your relationship with your worker much more trusting and it helps them to know you better and give you the best help we can.

 

Meet the Team

Angela Payne - Team Leader / Senior Practitioner

Angela PayneHi I’m Angela. I am proud to be a Mental Health Nurse and have worked in various positions in SSSFT since 1999. My experience includes working with adults and adolescents with mental health issues, the majority of which were people experiencing the most complex and challenging mental health and social issues. 15 years ago I gained a Master’s Degree in working with severely mentally unwell people in the community setting – which was the stepping stone in developing my passion for supporting recovery in people’s own home environment. Excited by the prospect of leading a newly developing CAMHS team that works with young people to endeavour to keep them in their community, I came to CAMHS in 2016 – keen to make a meaningful difference early in young peoples’ life journeys.

At home I live with my daughter and we enjoy spending our time watching movies, especially science fiction, playing golf and socialising.

 

Rachael Archer - Mental Health Practitioner / Mental Health Nurse

Rachael ArcherHi I’m Rach. I have been a Registered Mental Health Nurse for 17 years. I have worked in a variety of roles since becoming a nurse mostly with adults with mental health issues in both the community and on inpatient wards. I spent 11 years of my career working with people who misuse drugs and alcohol in the community, on wards, prisons and police stations and this is an area I feel very passionately about. I came to work in CAMHS in 2016 when the Intensive Outreach Team first started.

At home I am married and have 2 children. I enjoy running to keep fit but my real passions are shopping and music (although people often tell me I have terrible music taste).

 

Naomi Watson - Mental Health Practitioner / Occupational Therapist

Naomi WatsonHi I’m Naomi. I have been an Occupational Therapist since 2005 and have worked for SSSFT since this time. I have worked in numerous teams, mainly working with adults with severe and enduring mental health difficulties, until I joined the CAMHS Intensive Outreach Team in 2016. I am keen to help people recover from mental health difficulties through “doing” things and engaging in meaningful activity by focusing on hobbies, interests and things that help you feel good.

In my home life I am married and have a daughter who keeps me busy. I also have a Labrador and enjoy long walks. I like to bake and cook and get involved in craft projects in my spare time.

 

Sharron Chamberlain - Mental Health Practitioner / Youth Worker

Sharron ChamberlainHello, my name is Sharron and I am a Youth Worker. I am a member of the Institute of Youth Work and I qualified in 2013. Over the past 21 years, I have worked in numerous settings in mental health including inpatient units and the community. I maintain close links with schools, colleges, universities and other youth focused facilities to ensure that all areas of a young person’s social aspect is thought about.

I am passionate that young people are supported in gaining skills that enable them to develop and achieve their aspirations, goals and hope for their future.

I am married and have 2 grown up children and a Dalmatian dog that is 9 years old now. I know I am getting old now but I love my Lego and bore anyone who gets to see all the pictures of my creations!

 

Andy Morecock - Mental Health Practitioner / Mental Health Nurse

Andy MorecockHi I’m Andy and I am a Mental Health Nurse. Prior to this I was a Health Care Support Worker for 9 years working in a variety of inpatient and community settings. From there I went to complete my nurse training, having placements in several environments caring for young people and adults. It was during this time I discovered that I wanted to work with young people and support them during their journeys.

I started working with the CAMHS Intensive Outreach Team in September 2016 when the service was introduced and enjoy working together with CAMHS and other agencies in my role.

Away from work I have 3 young children, I am passionate about rugby playing as well as watching and enjoy other sports, I have also completed the odd mud obstacle course for a challenge, and relax watching TV and movies.

 

Donna Lloyd – Team Secretary

Donna LloydHi, my name is Donna and I am a Team Secretary. I started my career in a high street bank where I worked for 20 years in various roles. I have worked for SSSFT since 2012, initially with the Perinatal Team on the Brockington Mother and Baby Unit before I came to work for the CAMHS Intensive Outreach Team in May 2017.

Outside of work I am kept busy by my 2 children. I enjoy going to the gym to keep fit and love to go shopping and holidays abroad.

 

What to expect at your first appointment

We want to spend time getting to know you. We will have a chat and start to plan how often we will see each other, where you would prefer to be seen - school, café, at home and we will talk to you about the Intensive Outreach Team and what support we can offer you.

We can give you a list of useful numbers or websites that may be helpful to you, we will definitely provide you with a copy of our team leaflet and our mobile phone numbers so you can call or text us.

We will already have spent time talking with your allocated CAMHS worker so don’t worry you won’t have to repeat everything you have already discussed in your individual sessions!

Outcome Measures

When you come to the Intensive Outreach Team you will probably be asked to complete some short forms called Outcome Measures. These help us together to spot where it is you are having problems and where you are doing well so that we can focus our work. They are also really useful for you as they can help you track your progress throughout your treatment. The information on these forms will always be anonymous and you can ask to see them at any time.

Confidentiality

When we first meet you we will tell you about confidentiality. This means that whatever you say will be kept between you and your CAMHS worker, unless you give permission for it to be shared. Even then, you can say if you want your family, school or other people to know.

We won’t tell your parents if you don’t want us to!

In some circumstances, when we feel that your safety or the safety of others might be at risk, we will have to break our confidentiality and tell someone, usually your parent or carer, so that we can make sure you stay safe. If this happens we will talk it through with you first, and you can decide if you want to be there, or if you would prefer us to speak to them separately.

 

What do young people say about us?

“Very understanding and supportive”

“Places I felt comfortable in - not a clinical environment”

“Really appreciate that appointments are at a convenient time”

“Developed lots of strategies to prevent relapse in the future”

“I felt listened to and got on really well with my worker”

“CAMHS Outreach have made a major difference in my life they have been there for me to talk to and share what I bottle up”

“The support offered here was unlike any other programme I was part of – it was more personal and flexible”

“My views and worries were taken very seriously and took on board to help me. I also learnt better ways to cope with my problems or when things triggered me”

 

Team contact details

Telephone Number: 0300 124 5023

EatingDisorders

The Eating Disorder Service is based in Lichfield, but reaches out to help support young people all across South Staffordshire. It is a service which provides help and support for young people who are experiencing difficulties with their relationship with food. Within this service you could expect to meet dieticians, mental health professionals, and consultants. The service works towards helping young people challenge their anxieties towards food and to also maintain a healthy attitude and relationship with food to last a lifetime.

A Receptionist will say hello when you arrive, let your worker know you are here and make sure your contact details and appointments are up to date. They may also ask you to fill out forms or provide some feedback.

A psychologist is interested in the scientific study of how people think, feel and behave. They use this knowledge to help people make sense of things and work on making changes to improve their quality of life. Psychologists use a range of evidence-based treatments to do this work. Most of these treatments involve some talking therapy although more creative approaches to therapy are also used as required. It all depends on your individual need and what works for you. Psychologists are also trained to use specialist tools to assess and understand difficulties; these tools are used in combination with the information you and your family provide to form an understanding of what might be going on and to plan with you the most effective treatment.

CAMHS Nurses are trained to understand all mental health difficulties and will have a variety of therapy and other skills to help you in the most useful way. Our CAMHS nurses do NOT wear a uniform but do have lots of experience working with young people who need their help. Some of the nurses are non-medical prescribers and will discuss medication with you.

Not all personal issues are easy to talk or think about. Art Therapists can help make this easier or possible by providing a choice of art materials to use alongside or instead of talking. They won't expect you to be good at art, just willing to try. An art therapist will have a background in using art but also a full training as an art therapist.

Child Psychotherapists will try to understand what is troubling you, and help you put your thoughts and feelings into words. Making sense of difficulties alongside another person can make things easier to manage. We use drawing/painting, toys or talking, depending on how you feel most comfortable communicating. There's no pressure to talk about difficult things directly. First of all, you will be given a series of appointments to see if this way of working will be helpful. We might also want to see you alongside your family, too, and sometimes we might want to see your parents on their own.

Occupational Therapists are interested in activities you do and helping you to do the things you want or need to do in life. You may not be able to do some of these things due to your emotional health. We may focus more on the practical ways of helping you to achieve your goals – for example, you may feel unable to go out and meet your friends due to how you feel. Your OT will work with you to help you achieve this by breaking it down into manageable steps.

Family therapy can help children and young people, struggling with mental health issues, by looking at relationships within their families, so that they improve the understanding of each other and therefore better support each other. It helps family members to talk about and express difficult thoughts and feelings in a safe way, hear each other's views and experiences, appreciate each other's needs, build on strengths and work on positive changes in relationships and life.

Child & Adolescent Psychiatrists are medical doctors who specialise in the assessment and treatment of mental health, emotional and behavioural problems in children and young people. They work as part of the CAMHS team (which consists of nurses, psychologists, different types of therapists) and the team decides who is the best person to help a young person referred to the service with their particular problem.

Youth workers are able to use a variety of skills to help young people within the service, like having a chat over coffee to playing a game of pool. They can adapt their techniques and style of working around whatever young person prefers and needs.

Primary Mental health Workers (PMHWs) are usually based in the community near to where young people live, and they offer what is called an early intervention and prevention service to children, young people and their families, to promote emotional health and well-being. They help children and young people to deal with their emotional or behavioural difficulties before they get too complicated and well established. Sometimes PMHWs work on a 1-1 basis with the young person, sometimes they work with the parents or carers, or sometimes a bit of both. It all depends on what suits the young person, what the young person wants and what is the best way of addressing their issues.

The role of a PMHW also includes training and advising teachers and other professionals to increase their awareness and understanding of the emotional health issues that affect young people. This helps them to be able to identify those issues and to know what they can do to help. This means that the teacher or other professional (e.g. school nurse or family support worker) may be able to help the young person without having to make a referral into CAMHS.

CAMHS Social Workers are different from other social workers in that they are based and work in CAMHS, as part of the multi-disciplinary Team.. They will have a variety of training, skills and experience in supporting children, young people and families to keep them safe, healthy and happy. CAMHS social workers also support and give advice to other workers in the CAMHS team and other services, as well as having important therapy skills too!